Carbon Transfer Print – My First

Welcome to Big Mountain Photography

(Dashan Sheying –大山摄影)

This week I heard the good news that Calvin Grier of Valencia, Spain completed my first ever Carbon Transfer Print- see the video of JDR.  I used my Shenhao 6×17 medium format,  negative size of  5.6 cm x 16.8cm.

I submitted a finished TIFF file 2 weeks ago to Calvin who then worked his magic.  The final image size is 18cm x 57 cm or 7″ by 22.5″ then add the white border to complete the print.

The Feature Image is the final print hung to dry.  Lovely work by Calvin, can’t wait to present it to JDR, get it framed and finally see it hung on our wall.

Video of the Print Having its Final Wash

The Carbon Transfer Print is considered by most persons who know it to be one of the most beautiful of all photographic processes. Carbon prints are capable of a wide range of image characteristics, they can be virtually any color or tone, and the final image can be placed on a wide variety of surfaces, including glass, metal, paper, as well as various kinds of synthetic surfaces.

Carbon is without question the most distinctive and stable of all photographic processes, capable of presenting images with a wide range of characteristics, of virtually any color or tone, on a wide variety of surfaces.

Finally, carbon transfer prints, which are made up of inert pigment(s) suspended in a hardened gelatin colloid, are the most stable of all photographic prints.

Calvin’s Grier Homepage – Stop By.

Here are the images showing the major process steps:

1) Negatives (3) From the Highlights, Mid-Tones, and Shadows

2) Exposing

3) Developing the 1st Layer

4) 1st Layer

5) Relief of the Wet Emulsion

6) Developing the 2nd Layer

7) Wet Relief

8) Wet Relief

9) Finished Print on Temporary Support

10) Cleaning Border

11) Removal of Light-Sensitive Salts

12) Transferring to Paper

13) Final Print

All About the Light

Welcome to Big Mountain Photography

(Dashan Sheying –大山摄影)

As my photography journey continues and believe me it is continuing as I evolve my taste for “light”, I’ve taken fewer photos while attempting to stalk the “light”.   I believe this is a by-product from shifting back to film while staying 50-50 with digital.

With medium format 120 film, images per roll range from 4 to 12:

  • Fuji GF670: at 10 – 6×7 or 12 – 6×6 images per roll
  • Mamiya C330: 12 – 6×6 images per roll
  • Hasselblad 500CM: 12 – 6×6 images per roll
  • Shenhao 6×17 View Camera: 4 images per roll
  • RSS Pinhole Camera: 4 images per roll

Given the limited number of images, you need to think each and every composition through while stalking the light.  Often, I catch myself rushing for the next image and say it’s not a digital experience I’m seeking.  So this gallery is my “Light Stalker” of both digital and film where the focus is to capture and process for the light, always the light.

Patronage: Please “Follow” along as our adventure continues in the UK and EU  Comments, Likes, … always welcomed here.

Featured Image Above: “Ganesh Immersion at Foreshore Beach, Chennai“. I took this image from atop the hand-lashed platform.

Light Stalker Gallery: Mamiya C330 Medium Format Film and Fuji X-Pro2 Digital

 

Edinburgh, Scotland

Welcome to Big Mountain Photography

(Dashan Sheying –大山摄影)

In short, our weekend trip (4-days) by train from Birmingham was most enjoyable, lovely.  I’d go back here again ahead of returning to London.  Nothing special to report other than acquiring a new medium format camera: Hasselblad 500CM (1985) w/80mm f/2.8  Just finished my first roll and now into Palm Labs for developing, scanning and uploading.

Patronage: Please “Follow” along as our adventure continues in the UK and EU  Comments, Likes, … always welcomed here.

Featured Image Above: “Balmoral Hotel” rainbow.

Edinburgh Gallery: Mamiya C330 Medium Format Film and Fuji X-Pro2 Digital